Forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it. Forget having It All: How America Messed Up Motherhood 2019-01-24

Forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it Rating: 6,6/10 1596 reviews

Forget It

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

This book read like a textbook which is what stopped me from giving it 5 stars. I especially appreciate that the author provides practical suggestions for policy changes with each chapter. After filing a story only two hours after giving birth, and then getting straight back to full-time work the next morning, journalist Amy Westervelt had a revelation: America mig A clear-eyed look at the history of American ideas about motherhood, how those ideas have impacted all women whether they have kids or not , and how to fix the inequality that exists as a result. It was affirming and inspirational and gave me hope that things are going to shift eventually. Even in countries and companies where parental leave provisions exist there has been relatively little take-up by men. She is a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Society, London, U.

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Forget It

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

Being a Tiger Mother can also be a full-time job. Outside the white middle-class mothers were obliged to work outside the home as well as in it, at the same time feeling that parenting was not a chore or a trap, but rather the relationship in which they were most affirmed and appreciated. A clear-eyed look at the history of American ideas about motherhood, how those ideas have impacted all women whether they have kids or not , and how to fix the inequality that exists as a result. Ultimately, Westervelt presents a measured, historically rooted and research-backed call for workplace policies, cultural norms, and personal attitudes about motherhood that will radically improve the lives of not just working moms but all Americans. Using this historical backdrop, Westervelt draws out what we should replicate from our past bringing back home economics, for example, this time with an emphasis on gender-balanced labor in the home , and what we must begin anew as we overhaul American motherhood including taking a more intersectional view of motherhood, thinking deeply about the ways in which capitalism influences our views on reproduction, and incorporating working fathers into discussions about work-life balance. After filing a story only two hours after giving birth, and then getting straight back to full-time work the next morning, journalist Amy Westervelt had a revelation: America might claim to revere motherhood, but it treats women who have children like crap.

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The history of motherhood ... and how America messed it up

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

This brings to mind what Betty Friedan wrote in her groundbreaking and perhaps now somewhat overlooked book The Feminine Mystique 1963 about the needless overcomplication of housework rituals to convince women that staying home could be a career. After filing a story only two hours after giving birth, and then getting straight back to full-time work the next morning, journalist Amy Westervelt had a revelation: America might claim to revere motherhood, but it treats women who have children like crap. However, I am a mother subject to our culture's messed-up-ness about all of it and so I am very tired and I require jazz hands on all my nonfiction these days; take my criticism with that barrel of salt. All of the policies aren't going to help if people don't start changing their attitudes toward both work and parenting. Using this historical backdrop, Westervelt draws out what we should replicate from our past bringing back home economics, for example, this time with an emphasis on gender-balanced labor in the home , and what we must begin anew as we overhaul American motherhood including taking a more intersectional view of motherhood, thinking deeply about the ways in which capitalism influences our views on reproduction, and incorporating working fathers into discussions about work-life balance. I found she worded some issues well that I've always struggled to articulate. I found the history bits more interesting: Who knew the abortion rate probably peaked in the mid-1800s, or that the Puritans thought fathers should be the main teachers of their families because they didn't trust women's moral foundations? They're used as ideas, but Westervelt readily acknowledges that if you graft on other countries' policies onto American culture, they may fail in ways they don't expect.

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Forget having It All: How America Messed Up Motherhood

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

I found this an illuminating in the history of American feminism, as told through the crucial lens of motherhood and care. Ultimately, Westervelt presents a measured, historically rooted and research-backed call for workplace policies, cultural norms, and personal attitudes about motherhood that will radically improve the lives of not just working moms but all Americans. This narrative lays the ground for her interesting discussion of the different positions on mothering and work-life balance taken by white middle-class and black feminists, both equally valid on their own terms. Her criticisms are nuanced and calm, which I like. Her vast global human rights experience includes a variety of assignments working for the United Nations and the European Union. In this theoretical future, neither men nor women would consider caring for children or aging parents an embarrassing pursuit, and they would have a variety of formal and informal structures to help them balance it all.

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#10: Forget It How America Messed Up Motherhood

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

In looking for inspiration elsewhere in the world, Westervelt turned not to Scandinavia, where every work-life balance story inevitably ends up, but to Japan where politicians, in an increasingly desperate effort to increase the country's birth rates sound familiar? This book's research and intention felt important, so I wish I'd been able to finish it, but I found the writing style overly rigid: it felt like the platonic ideal of high school essay. For those women, no one is demanding that they get a job so this backlash as to why people are infuriated makes no sense. It is unattainable and for women maybe there are some men but in general, the book was about women and men aren't held to the same parenting standards to keep trying to work like they don't have kids and have kids like they don't work isn't working. In these, Westervelt draws clear contrasts between the experiences of white, black and American Indian mothers, and includes immigrant families from other parts of the world in later chapters. Using this historical backdrop, Westervelt draws out what we should replicate from our past bringing back home economics, for example, this time with an emphasis on gender-balanced labor in the home , and what we must begin anew as we overhaul American motherhood including taking a more intersectional view of motherhood, thinking deeply about the ways in which capitalism influences our views on reproduction, and incorporating working fathers into discussions about work-life balance. Westervelt reviews various ideologies of motherhood primarily in an American context beginning with the arrival of the Puritans in the New World.

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Forget It

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

These chapters make it clear that there has never been one type of American mother, or clear agreement on what a mother should be. At the end of each chapter, Westervelt includes a proposed policy fix and a separate cultural fix for the problem described. Ultimately, Westervelt presents a measured, historically rooted and research-backed call for workplace policies, cultural norms, and personal attitudes about motherhood that will radically improve the lives of not just working moms but all Americans. She demonstrates that African American families and those of Native American women had an approach to mothering that was much more community-minded and that the kind of community-mothering that was the norm has proved to be far more resilient and adaptable than the nuclear family model embraced by Europeans. She sees a key to resolving this is to find a way to endow behaviors and qualities associated with motherhood with a positive social value such that men as well as women would be eager to parent. It is more demanding than it has ever been and at a time when generally both parents work and so many have no support with extended family.

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Forget having It All: How America Messed Up Motherhood

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

After filing a story only two hours after giving birth, and then getting straight back to full-time work the next morning, journalist Amy Westervelt had a revelation: America might claim to revere motherhood, but it treats women who have children like crap. A lot of information is packed into a not very long book, and she shoots facts out at you a bit. And if it's not working so well, she wants you to know it's not your fault. A clear-eyed look at the history of American ideas about motherhood, how those ideas have impacted all women whether they have kids or not , and how to fix the inequality that exists as a result. It was more of a history on how America got to this idea of divine motherhood where women live to have children and serve their family and have no desire to achieve anything outside of being a support person.

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The history of motherhood ... and how America messed it up

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

In looking for inspiration elsewhere in the world, Westervelt turned not to Scandinavia, where every work-life balance story inevitably ends up, but to Japan where politicians, in an increasingly desperate effort to increase the country's birth rates sound familiar? I read it cover to cover and it is a little repetitive at times- quotes, anecdotes and history lessons might appear in more than one chapter. I suspect the Millennials will demand it. Using this historical backdrop, Westervelt draws out what we should replicate from our past bringing back home economics, for example, this time with an emphasis on gender-balanced labor in the home , and what we must begin anew as we overhaul American motherhood including taking a more intersectional view of motherhood, thinking deeply about the ways in which capitalism influences our views on reproduction, and incorporating working fathers into discussions about work-life balance. Author offers strong dislike for patriarchy and admonishes men for not taking enough time off work to help with newborns, and boys for not spending enough time caring for young siblings or cousins. . It was dry at times but filled with helpful information.

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a book review by Jane Haile: Forget It How America Messed Up Motherhood

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

Ultimately, Westervelt presents a measured, historically rooted and research-backed call for workplace policies, cultural norms, and personal attitudes about motherhood that will radically improve the lives of not just working moms but all Americans. After filing a story only two hours after giving birth, and then getting straight back to full-time work the next morning, journalist Amy Westervelt had a revelation: America might claim to revere motherhood, but it treats women who have children like crap. It's informative and I learned a lot of details, but a little more of the author's own voice and ideas would have been nice. Many of these ideas seemed lofty, but they were an important benchmark to put out there for our society, to improve it not just for women but also for the men who are stuck in systems that they may not realize oppress them. I especially appreciate that the author provides practical suggestions for policy changes with each chapter. There isn't enough room to stop, reflect, ruminate, breathe.

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Forget It

forget having it all how america messed up motherhoodand how to fix it

It was more of a history on how America got to this idea of divine motherhood where women live to have children and serve their family and have no desire to achieve anything outside of being a support person. By the end, Westervelt calls for a radical reimagining of American values, which would assign just as much value to caregiving as to competition. Using this historical backdrop, Westervelt draws out what we should replicate from our past bringing back home economics, for example, this time with an emphasis on gender-balanced labor in the home , and what we must begin anew as we overhaul American motherhood including taking a more intersectional view of motherhood, thinking deeply about the ways in which capitalism influences our views on reproduction, and incorporating working fathers into discussions about work-life balance. She points to the example of Japan, however, as proof that policies themselves aren't enough — Japanese law offers generous benefits to parents, but employers haven't gotten on board, so that most men still work long hours and many women have decided not to give up their careers to raise a child without help. Synopsis A clear-eyed look at the history of American ideas about motherhood, how those ideas have impacted all women whether they have kids or not , and how to fix the inequality that exists as a result.

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