My life with things the consumer diaries. My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries 2019-03-01

My life with things the consumer diaries Rating: 6,4/10 750 reviews

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my life with things the consumer diaries

However, unlike in My Life with Things the consumption stories Tsing tracks for Matsutake enable us to understand and critically engage with global capitalism by the deliberate centering of an alternative vantage point which Tsing herself inhabits through her research. Chin uses her anthropological background to present an autoethnography, combining research, theory, and personal writing to criticize and commiserate with our love of objects. A second collection of papers from Marx and Philosophy Society conferences. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items—kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano—and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with perso Unconventional and provocative, My Life with Things is Elizabeth Chin's meditation on her relationship with consumer goods and a critical statement on the politics and method of anthropology. In My Life With Things, she is winningly alert to the ambivalence around our acts of consumption, both the awful guilt and the immeasurable pleasure nonetheless. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items—kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano—and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with personal and social meaning: from writing love haikus about her favorite nail polish and discussing the racial implications of her tooth implant, to revealing how she used shopping to cope with a miscarriage and contemplating how her young daughter came to think that she needed Lunesta.

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My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries

my life with things the consumer diaries

Throughout, Chin keeps Karl Marx and his family's relationship to their possessions in mind, drawing parallels between Marx's napkins, the production of late nineteenth-century table linens, and Chin's own vintage linen collection. It poses new questions, approaches old ones in fresh ways, and tugs at the complex heart of people's relationship to the things they have and the things they want. Unflinchingly and refreshingly honest, Chin unlocks the complexities of her attachments to, reliance on, and complicated relationships with her things. Unflinchingly and refreshingly honest, Chin unlocks the complexities of her attachments to, reliance on, and complicated relationships with her things. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items—kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano—and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with personal and social meaning: from writing love haikus about her favorite nail polish and discussing the racial implications of her tooth cap, to revealing how she used shopping to cope with a miscarriage and contemplating how her young daughter came to think that she needed Lunesta. In so doing, she prompts readers to reconsider their own consumption, as well as their assumptions about the possibilities for creative scholarship. Chin's use of short essays, autoethnography, colloquial language, and often poetic prose make for an elegant, original, insightful, and accessible book.

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‘My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries’ reviewed by Jeffrey Petts

my life with things the consumer diaries

Throughout, Chin keeps Karl Marx and his family's relationship to their possessions in mind, drawing parallels between Marx's napkins, the production of late nineteenth-century table linens, and Chin's own vintage linen collection. The results can be exhilarating, giving readers self-reflexive pause on the consumptive world and how they got there. In so doing, she prompts readers to reconsider their own consumption, as well as their assumptions about the possibilities for creative scholarship. Ebook Description Unconventional and provocative, My Life with Things is Elizabeth Chin's meditation on her relationship with consumer goods and a critical statement on the politics and method of anthropology. This is particularly troublesome in the vignettes that focus on Haiti in which her acknowledgment of the economic and political inequalities that inevitably underpin her research makes us yearn for her to reposition herself, at least through the opening up of this account to some other voices. Practical implications Implications for companies in consumer markets are discussed, suggesting ways to facilitate the process of sociocultural brand revitalization. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items—kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano—and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with personal and social meaning: from writing love haikus about her favorite nail polish and discussing the racial implications of her tooth cap, to revealing how she used shopping to cope with a miscarriage and contemplating how her young daughter came to think that she needed Lunesta.

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Book Review: My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries by Elizabeth Chin

my life with things the consumer diaries

Unflinchingly and refreshingly honest, Chin unlocks the complexities of her attachments to, reliance on, and complicated relationships with her things. I don't read a lot of scholarly books these days, and I will say that this one is slightly less scholarly and more accessible than many books we publish note, I work for the publisher. Purpose The purpose of the paper is to build a sociocultural perspective of brand revitalization. The focus of attention is the Gothic community, a consumer tribe that may be described as extraordinary and spectacular. Since favorite objects serve as storehouses of personal meanings, gender, age, and culture reflect differences in object selected as well as reasons for selection.

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My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries

my life with things the consumer diaries

In so doing, she prompts readers to reconsider their own consumption, as well as their assumptions about the possibilities for creative scholarship. The interspersing of information and stories abo I don't read a lot of scholarly books these days, and I will say that this one is slightly less scholarly and more accessible than many books we publish note, I work for the publisher. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items—kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano—and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with personal and social meaning: from writing love haikus about her favorite nail polish and discussing the racial implications of her tooth cap, to revealing how she used shopping to cope with a miscarriage and contemplating how her young daughter came to think that she needed Lunesta. We uncover processes that move an already singularized object in and out of a network of practices, objects, and spaces; identify forces that constrain and empower a singularized object's agency within that network; and demonstrate network transformations that result from the focal object's movement. There is a marvelous trajectory for experimental ethnography in which a number of prominent female anthropologists have been working to develop alternative writing styles with which to deal with contemporary culture and geopolitics in which we are all implicated. Findings The paper presents a conceptual model of cultural brand revitalization that has four stages: sleeping brand, spontaneous appropriation, diffusion and convergence. Unconventional and provocative, My Life with Things is Elizabeth Chin's meditation on her relationship with consumer goods and a critical statement on the politics and method of anthropology.

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My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries

my life with things the consumer diaries

We might consider, for example, how this record of a life with things in an advanced, post-industrial capitalist society sits with recent accounts of late capitalism. Chin centers the book on diary entries that focus on everyday items--kitchen cabinet knobs, shoes, a piano--and uses them to intimately examine the ways consumption resonates with personal and social meaning: from writing love haikus about her favorite nail polish and discussing the racial implications of her tooth cap, to revealing how she used shopping to cope with a miscarriage and contemplating how her young daughter came to think that she needed Lunesta. This Never Happened 203 Notes 221 Bibliography 227 Index 235. In My Life With Things, she is winningly alert to the ambivalence around our acts of consumption, both the awful guilt and the immeasurable pleasure nonetheless. Our study contributes to understanding the role of material culture in families. Data were generated using an inductive theory building approach utilizing multiple methods, including interviews, participant observation and cultural materials. The results can be exhilarating, giving readers self-reflexive pause on the consumptive world and how they got there.

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My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries

my life with things the consumer diaries

Chin is a good writer and her willingness to expose herself here is engaging. By Frances Larson, Oxford University Press, 2009. The field note records the Idea that a maid makes most of us well, those who can afford it! Maintaining brands and bringing them back to life in the market has received much less interest than their creation. I can imagine it as a resource for teachers as well as students, and I envision many imaginative and lively discussions based on objects described in this book as well as the particular objects animating others' lives and relationships. We draw on a longitudinal grounded theory study conducted at the bi-annual Whitby Goth festival in the North East of England which involved participation, observation, interviews, and videographic data. This extension explains some paradoxical findings in consumer research: how objects are granted agency even while displaced, when irreplaceable objects can be replaced, and why families sometimes displace central identity practices. Unconventional and provocative, My Life with Things is Elizabeth Chin's meditation on her relationship with consumer goods and a critical statement on the politics and method of anthropology.

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My Life with Things: The Consumer Diaries by Elizabeth Chin

my life with things the consumer diaries

The Entries 37 My Life with Things 37 Learn to Love Stuff 38 Banky 40 A Digression on the Topic of the Transitional Object 42 Cebebrate! Chin effects a parallelism through her own account of her obsession with her kitchen knobs, scarves, and thrift stores. Goths are also a group that has associations with the 'dark' side and in particular with the vampire. It suggests that youth-related activities are migrating up the age scale and draws on the results of a phenomenological study to support this. Chin points to the four thick binders of field notes that ground her writing 187. These are interspersed with a tracking of the personal and familial relationships of Karl Marx. The paper concludes by considering the consequences of representing a mono-cultural heritage in a multi-ethnic society.

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My life with things: the consumer diaries

my life with things the consumer diaries

Both sets of personal accounts are bookended by deft, although hardly new, summaries of trajectories of thinking about commodity fetishism, alienation, transitional objects, the aura of mass produced consumables, and the trope of auto-ethnography. But there were times when things she wrote about made me uncomfortable and I wondered what contribution they were making to her argument. Nor do the vignettes about Karl, Jenny, and Eleanor Marx really do much for developing a critical pathway through her own complex psycho-dramas. We suggest that theatrical co-construction may be understood in terms of three components: theater as 'transformation', theater as 'transcendence', and theater as 'temporality'. But there were times when things she wrote about made me uncomfortable and I wondered what contribution they were making to her argument. This paper uses Croatia in the former Yugoslavia as a case for analyzing the implications of manipulating history.

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My Life With Things: The Consumer Diaries — Forthcoming from Duke University Press, spring 2016

my life with things the consumer diaries

Unflinchingly and refreshingly honest, Chin unlocks the complexities of her attachments to, reliance on, and complicated relationships with her things. Just as in other life moments and journeys, it is full of fodder for contemplation and discussion as well as catalysts for new perspectives. Anna Tsing, like Chin, draws on her Asian-American ethnicity and deploys a deceptively simply, on occasion poetic, writing style in The Mushroom at the End of the World. It should certainly appeal to the more adventurous, less conventional academic from across the social sciences and not just anthropology, the author's home discipline. Her candid accounts of how much she earns, miscarrying a baby in Ikea, displacing her anorexia onto shopping, and projecting her family insecurities onto antique carpets are compelling, albeit in perhaps a voyeuristic way — I read the book as I would a bedtime novel. Such moves from personal experiences and reflections to the terminology of Marxist analysis are provocative, at least in their context as field notes.

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